Removing ‘Zombie’ Cells Could Help Us Live Longer
As we age, these damaged cells start to accumulate and cause sterile inflammation which can alter metabolism and stem cell function, promoting aging and the conditions that are often associated with it, like Alzheimer's disease. These zombie cells are formally called, senescent cells. Researchers at the University of Minnesota Medical School are now helping define just what those cells are and do.

Removing ‘Zombie’ Cells Could Help Us Live Longer

There maybe Drug That Removes ‘Zombie’ Cells which could help you ive l Longer. The removal of these Zombie cells may improve our health as we get older?  And you thought zombies only existed in horrible horror movie? 

    

Senescence defines a stable growth arrest that is induced when cells reach the end of their replicative potential or are exposed to various stressors. This cell state was discovered serendipitously by Leonard Hayflick when culturing primary human fibroblasts to grow viruses. Apr 8, 1960,  He discovered that most cell stop replicating themselves after 50 divisions,  His work in the 60's demonstrated that after 50 divisions these cells became zombies and generate al large quantity of toxins.  The creation of Zombie cells is defined as Senescence:  it occurs when stable growth is arrested when cells reach the end of their replicative potential or are exposed to various stressors. 

The research we are going to share below is highly controversial at this time.  Up until recently most biologist assumed cells can replicate themselves for ever.  We strongly recommend you do additional research as well as draw your own conclusions. 

Defining “Zombie Cells”

Defining “Zombie Cells”  Author: Krystle Barbour, Media Relations Manager  NOVEMBER 1, 2019  

 

 

Cells Reaching 50 Divisions
Normal Cells no Zombies
Zombie Cells don't flush
                                     

They’re called zombie cells, because they are damaged and refuse to die.

As we age, these damaged cells start to accumulate and cause sterile inflammation which can alter metabolism and stem cell function, promoting aging and the conditions that are often associated with it, like Alzheimer's disease. These zombie cells are formally called, senescent cells. Researchers at the University of Minnesota Medical School are now helping define just what those cells are and do.

Laura Niedernhofer, PhD, and Paul Robbins, PhD, director and associate director, respectively, for the Institute on the Biology of Aging and Metabolism (iBAM) are contributing authors of, “Cellular Senescence: Defining a Path Forward,” which was published in the leading journal “Cell” on Halloween.

As people age, they accumulate damaged cells. When the cells get to a certain level of damage, they go through an aging process of their own called cellular senescence. When cells become damaged or if they replicate too many times, they undergo a process of irreversible removal from the cell cycle and start releasing inflammatory factors that stimulate the immune response to clear the damaged cells. A younger person’s immune system is healthy and is able to clear the damaged cells, but as people age, they aren’t cleared as effectively and they accumulate causing potential problems.

Researchers have discovered how to clear these cells, so many companies are now developing drugs to remove the cells, with the hope of people leading healthier, longer lives. But, Robbins and Niederhofer wanted to know more. They and other leaders in the field from around the world collaborated on a review to define what senescent cells are and how to characterize them. They also asked questions such as, “How can I show if my senescent cell burden is higher than someone else's?''

“What was surprising was the lack of consensus. We realized the field is more complicated than any of the authors thought,” Robbins said. “What I was intrigued by was the heterogeneity of what I thought was a homogenous cell type and the ever-expanding list of the role of these cells in disease. The list keeps growing in terms of what these cells do.”

The research confirms that pathways that drive aging can be identified, and researchers can start to develop approaches to slow aging by targeting those pathways, not only in rodents but in humans. Indeed, multiple clinical trials to determine if these damaged Zombie cells can be eliminated using certain re-purposed, FDA approved drugs and natural products able to kill senescent cells specifically are currently in progress.

“What we were able to demonstrate here will lead to further experiments and research,”  Robbins said. “We are starting to define the field and revolutionize aging research.”

    

Mice with Zombie on left same mice after zombie cells removed.

Researchers plan to update their findings as new information is discovered in the field.

RELATED NEWS

 The attached blog, Zombie cells are reducing our health as we age  has been edited, Reed Wilson, director of Health and Communications from this original site:   https://www.healthline.com/health-news/anti-aging-treatment-that-kills-zombie-cells   In a recent trial, a new drug began clearing out “zombie cells” in 30 minutes.  

A new study shows that removing “zombie” cells — also known as senescent (aging or deteriorating) cells — from the body has the potential to slow down or even reverse some major diseases associated with aging.

Scientists have long known that an accumulation of senescent cells is linked to conditions such as arthritis, Parkinson’s disease, and Alzheimer’s disease.

Despite the potential shown in this recent research, Dr. James Kirkland, a professor of physiology and medicine at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota and senior study author, emphasized that the process isn’t a magic bullet.

“It’s a very preliminary study and we should plan other trials,” Dr. Kirkland told Healthline. “The biggest risk factor for most people is still their chronological age.”

Think of “zombie” cells as little vacuum cleaners that no longer work efficiently. But because they still work a bit, they’re not cleared out by the body.

At the same time, they’re too damaged to carry out their normal functions or repair tissue. So they clog up the works, leading to a gradual deterioration of the body.

In previous studies done with animals, removing these cells reversed the aging process and extended life span.

The most recent study showed improvements in humans for the first time. The three-week trial with 14 volunteers — all elderly and with pulmonary fibrosis — was intended to investigate the safety of a new drug.

The fact that the test subjects were able to walk more quickly, get up from a chair more easily, and scored better in ability tests was an unintended benefit.

Specifically, the results showed that after the trial, participants could walk an extra 25 yards during a 6-minute jaunt, and get up from their chairs 2 seconds more quickly.

They also scored an extra point on functionality tests, moving from an average of 10 points to 11 points.

“This is a glimmer that the drug might actually work. The results were impressive. All 14 people got better in their functional ability,” Kirkland told The Telegraph in England.

The new treatment, named DQ, uses a drug called dasatnib, which is already licensed for killing cancer cells in people with leukemia, and the drug quercetin, a common plant pigment found in red wine, onions, green tea, apples, berries, Ginkgo biloba, and St John’s wort.

The drug combination began clearing out the “zombie” cells within 30 minutes, and within 24 hours, all senescent cells were gone, the researchers reported.

Before you consider adding any supplements to your diet, Dr. Direct4u.com strongly recommends consulting your  Health Care Provider 

We will continue to follow up with research being done at the University of Minnesotta and the Mayo Clinic. 

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